EFFEKT’s harbour farm creates co-dependent community around sea-life

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Photo by EFFEKT

Danish architect practice EFFEKT has designed a harbour farm for Copenhagen’s inner harbour in collaboration with Danish concept and communications bureau KONVERS.

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Photo by EFFEKT

According to the architects, the true value of the project lies in its ability to simplify a hyper-stratified distribution and consumption process into one location, through the daily act of eating. It is this value that – maybe one day – will extend the Harbour Farm idea to harbours across the world.

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Photo by EFFEKT

EFFEKT is currently looking for investors who can operate the platform and the goal is to finish the project within two years. You can hear about more the Harbour Farm by visiting this year’s Rising Architecture Week 15-18 September in Copenhagen.

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Photo by EFFEKT

Architecturally wise, the Harbour Farm is divided into three sections. Below the surface you will find a series of 6 x 6 metre allotment units, which are fixed in a modular grid forming a compact field of mussels, oysters, seaweed and other sea-life.

Published
10.07.2015

‘What if the oysters you ordered could come straight from the harbour in Copenhagen and be on your plate … in a matter of minutes?’

That is basically the main idea behind Harbour Farm. Danish architect practice EFFEKT has designed a harbour farm for Copenhagen’s inner harbour in collaboration with Danish concept and communications bureau KONVERS.

The ambitious port regeneration project will allow Copenhageners to enjoy the benefits of urban fish farms, where seafood can be bred, harvested and served on site in restaurants. The Harbour Farm is also a social project that combines recreational activities alongside the sustainable production of fish, oysters and clams.

Architecturally wise, the Harbour Farm is divided into three sections. Below the surface you will find a series of 6 x 6 metre allotment units, which are fixed in a modular grid forming a compact field of mussels, oysters, seaweed and other sea-life.

High-end restaurants are located next to education facilities and outdoor markets above the surface. This is done to form a body of the co-dependent elements involved in the distribution of food and knowledge to the end user.

On the surface, the platform is arguably the most important element in the construction. It transcends its conventional function as an idle dock by becoming the connective tissue between the above and below surface areas, as well as being a key part of the structural system of Harbour Farm. From here, recreational activities, such as kayaking and swimming, will also take place.

When studying a sectional drawing of the Harbour Farm, the asymmetrical lines are reminiscent of Livsrum – a cancer counselling centre designed by EFFEKT, and, although the purposes of the buildings are completely different, there is a definite similarity in the architectural shape of the two buildings.

A number of fully organic, sustainable systems are planned to be put in place, including a water monitoring laboratory, turbines for producing energy and a natural waste system that will fertilize local rooftop crops, with the idea that these crops will be harvested and will make their way to the restaurants to be served alongside the home-grown fish and shellfish to complete the cycle. These systems will help facilitate the day-to-day activities and further highlight the sustainable nature of the project.

According to the architects, the true value of the project lies in its ability to simplify a hyper-stratified distribution and consumption process into one location, through the daily act of eating. It is this value that – maybe one day – will extend the Harbour Farm idea to harbours across the world.

EFFEKT is currently looking for investors who can operate the platform and the goal is to finish the project within two years. You can hear about more the Harbour Farm by visiting this year’s Rising Architecture Week 15-18 September in Copenhagen.