The quality of retaining and renewing architecture

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Photo by Lasse Lagoni

Based on the desire to upgrade and unite office and canteen areas for administrative and manufacturing staff, the Danish architectural studio Tegnestuen Mejeriet has redesigned an old malt factory in Haderslev, Denmark, for the Danish brewery Fuglsang.

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Photo by Lasse Lagoni

The new administrative, canteen and exhibition facilities are situated in a malt factory built in 1908. In addition to uniting staff, Fuglsang wanted to communicate the family-owned company’s long history by incorporating interesting documents and artefacts into some of the exhibition spaces.

03

Photo by Lasse Lagoni

With its architectural and industrial character, the building frames the administrative staff, canteen and historic exhibit spaces. Located on the top floor, the administrative department’s space features a long skylight, while the top floor offers views of Haderslev and its renowned pond.

04

Photo by Lasse Lagoni

To maintain and sustain the atmosphere of a brewery, some of the existing silos have been preserved. In addition, Mejeriet has sought to preserve and retain traces of the original malt house’s operations, which ran from 1908 until 2006.

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Photo by Lasse Lagoni

Vessels, silos and conveyor belts have been maintained in areas where they support the interior design, while the original styles of surfaces have been preserved.

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Photo by Lasse Lagoni

The transformation of the original malt production facility provided a festive way to mark the Fuglsang brewery’s 150th anniversary in 2015.

Published
29.03.2016

Based on the desire to upgrade and unite office and canteen areas for administrative and manufacturing staff, the Danish architectural studio Tegnestuen Mejeriet has redesigned an old malt factory in Haderslev, Denmark, for the Danish brewery Fuglsang.

The new administrative, canteen and exhibition facilities are situated in a malt factory built in 1908. In addition to uniting staff, Fuglsang wanted to communicate the family-owned company’s long history by incorporating interesting documents and artefacts into some of the exhibition spaces.

The three facilities mentioned above are housed on the two upper floors of one of the malt factory buildings. With its architectural and industrial character, the building frames the administrative staff, canteen and historic exhibit spaces. Located on the top floor, the administrative department’s space features a long skylight, while the top floor offers views of Haderslev and its renowned pond.

To maintain and sustain the atmosphere of a brewery, some of the existing silos have been preserved. In addition, Mejeriet has sought to preserve and retain traces of the original malt house’s operations, which ran from 1908 until 2006. Vessels, silos and conveyor belts have been maintained in areas where they support the interior design, while the original styles of surfaces have been preserved. New additions are meant to appear contemporary, and they are clearly separated from the original building elements.

“Transforming an older building like the Fuglsang malt house is like receiving a present we must manage with care. Our approach to the assignment has therefore focused on three essential topics: the original architecture, the added architecture and the connections between the two,” says Mikkel Thohøj Martinusen, Architect and Partner at Tegnestuen Mejeriet.

The two top floors can be accessed via an entirely new staircase or via direct connections from the factory spaces on all floors. The stairwell is a significant unifying element that features an open connection to the top floors. The canteen and exhibition spaces are linked to the level beneath the administrative department. This floor offers a great view, and according to the architects, the connection between the canteen and exhibition space is inspiring to visitors and staff.

“We want to expose the original architecture because it is beautiful and because of its history. At the same time, we want to enhance the new additions because the brewery’s history must continue—the company has been owned by the same family since the company was founded 151 years ago. Our add-ons have to mirror this. Finally, we want to combine the original building elements and the added architecture in a way that make the original affect the added architecture,” says Martinusen.

Three large steel vessels in the canteen floor have been preserved, while the rest have been entirely or partially removed, and the resulting holes in the floor have been covered with linoleum tiles. These areas thus serve as small islands on the untreated concrete flooring where people can relax.

Ultimately, the transformation of the original malt production facility provided a festive way to mark the Fuglsang brewery’s 150th anniversary in 2015.

Companies mentioned in this article