Three Remarkable Danish-designed Bridges

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Symbolic meaning about bridges through Danish designers

Photo by SLA / Torben Petersen

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Symbolic meaning about bridges through Danish designers

Photo by SLA / Torben Petersen

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Symbolic meaning about bridges through Danish designers

Photo by SLA / Torben Petersen

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Symbolic meaning about bridges through Danish designers

Photo by Adam Mørk

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Symbolic meaning about bridges through Danish designers

Photo by Adam Mørk

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Symbolic meaning about bridges through Danish designers

Photo by Adam Mørk

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Symbolic meaning about bridges through Danish designers

Visualisation by DISSING+WEITLING architecture / COWI

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Symbolic meaning about bridges through Danish designers

Visualisation by DISSING+WEITLING architecture / COWI

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Symbolic meaning about bridges through Danish designers

Visualisation by DISSING+WEITLING architecture / COWI

Published
06.01.2017

There is something symbolic about bridges, whether they connect the mainland with an island, help us pass above difficult terrain, or make our infrastructure less complicated. The common denominator is that bridges connect places, which is an admirable feature by itself. But when you add splendid architectural alchemy to this connection, you end up with cool landmarks. Here, we bring you three examples of Danish-designed bridges – one small, one a bit bigger and finally, an 11-km bridge in South America.

The Belvedere Bridge, Copenhagen, Denmark – by SLA

The Danish urban development consultancy SLA, which specialises in landscape, urban design and city planning, has designed this awesome bridge in Copenhagen. Connecting Frederiks Brygge and Enghave Brygge, this bright red bridge is inspired by the anatomical shape of a spine. According to the architects, the bridge brings a poetic silence to the rough industrial area. The Belvedere is a bike and footbridge and is one of the newest bridges in a series that makes the inner city of Copenhagen even better connected.

Based on the principles of Japanese origami, the bridge is an assembly of folded sheets of steel that strengthen the construction and give the bridge a light and floating expression. The red bricks and rusty steel found in the area are reflected in the red colour on the outside of the bridge, which is in strong contrast with the black rubber coating inside. According to SLA, the rubber absorbs the noise from the bikes and pedestrians and the result is a short, silent and poetic experience in the middle of the rough and noisy industrial neighbourhood of Sydhavnen (a harbour district in Copenhagen).

The Bridge by ‘Buen’ Cultural Centre, Mandal, Norway – by 3XN

As part of a new and attractive quarter of Mandal, Norway, the Danish architectural firm 3XN has designed a bike and footbridge connecting the cultural centre ‘Buen’ with the other side of the river.

With a soft and elegant movement that interacts with the materials and shape of the cultural centre, the bridge seeks to bind the city’s two parts together. Both the bridge and the adjoining cultural centre have a white and light expression, which corresponds to the surrounding area’s white wooden houses, scenic narrow streets, water, beach and forest.

The bridge has a slight curve and two pockets, which invite users to stop and relax. In this way, the architects have intended the bridge to be a social meeting place where the view of Norway’s southernmost city can be enjoyed to the fullest.

The Salvador-Itaparica Bridge, Salvador, Brazil – by DISSING+WEITLING architecture

The 11-km Salvador-Itaparica Bridge will connect metropolitan Salvador, Brazil, with the island of Itaparica, and is part of a major infrastructure project in Bahia State. According to the Danish architect behind the project, DISSING+WEITLING architecture, the bridge will create great opportunities for development on the island.

Significantly reducing travel time between the eastern and western parts of Bahia, the fixed link is expected to boost the economy in the south-westernmost part of the state, which is among the poorest regions of Bahia. In addition, the future bridge will be the second-largest in Latin America, consisting of a very spectacular main span with a height of 120 m and a length of 550 m. The large ground clearance is due to a request to sail oil-drilling platforms under the bridge. Consequently, the bridge pylons will have a height of 285 m and be some of the tallest in the world.

Companies mentioned in this article