The AART of a Strong DNA in Design and Architecture

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Aart CPH

Anders Tyrrestrup in dialogue with designer Morten Hove Lasthein.

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IGLOO AART VUC SYD HADERSLEV

Photo by Kirstine Mengel

The IGLOOs at VUC Syd Haderslev

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IGLOO AART VUC SYD HADERSLEV

Photo by Kirstine Mengel

The IGLOOs at VUC Syd Haderslev

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Oslo Opera House Norway

Visual by Focus Lighting

SKY

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2016-03-04 Wing_Prototype 01

Photo by AART designers

Wing

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Photo by Adam Mørk

Vannkanten

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Photo by Adam Mørk

Kulturværftet

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Musholm

Photo by Kristine Mengel

Musholm

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VUC Syd - Haderslev

Photo by Adam Mørk

VUC Syd - Haderslev

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Photo by Adam Mørk

VUC Syd - Haderslev

Published
07.03.2018

AART value the impact that design and architecture have on people so much that they see it as part of their DNA. In this article, we dive a little bit deeper into our March-theme ‘branding in design and architecture’ by exploring how one of Scandinavia’s leading companies within design and architecture deploy a brand identity throughout all their projects.

Creating opportunities

How do you recognize an AART design? Whether it is a building or a piece of furniture design, one thing you will always recognize in all AART designs is the sense of “opportunities”. The designs aim to create an impact and new opportunities for the people who use the designs and for the surrounding community.

“We want to open new perspectives and drive development throughout the branches, but with a social mindset. To us design and architecture is a people business, where we discover, challenge and create our common, physical environments – always striving to give people the opportunity to live healthier, smarter and more connected lives,” says Anders Tyrrestrup, founding partner of AART architects.

A user-centred approach to design and architecture is therefore part of the DNA of an AART project and it’s transparent in all the various kinds of projects that AART do.

Anders Tyrrestrup elaborates: “When building schools, it means stimulating students’ desire to learn; for building companies, it means strengthening the employees’ ability to share knowledge and for cultural organisations, it is important to tie visitors and cities together in a new way. What is special about our work is therefore that we think of the possibilities before the form, and we approach every project – big or small – on its own premises”.

Combining design and architecture

The human-centred approach also applies when working in the field of combining architecture and design. And the knowledge from one paradigm can strengthen the designs in the other.

“Our dedicated design unit, AART designers, work with combining empathy with a high professionalism and with a strong sense of the materials used through our products, such as LOOP, a modular bench system developed together with Out-sider, SKY, a park light developed together with Focus Lighting, and Wing, where we together with Randi have developed an award-winning door grip, creating a symbiosis between the stringent and the organic,” says Anders Tyrrestrup.

 

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Photo by Out-sider

 

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Wing – Photo by AART designers

 

Oslo Opera House Norway

SKY – Visual by Focus Lighting

But when applying both architecture and design to a project is where AART really show their full potential.

Anders Tyrrestrup highlights a project that he thinks stands out: “The education centre for VUC Syd is one example of exactly that. Starting out as an architectural project, we brought design into play, creating a completely specialized interior, such as the IGLOO developed together with Holmris. The students and teachers later highlighted the IGLOOs as unique rooms for learning with great flexibility and exiting digital perspectives. The education centre is in many ways a strong example of our AART DNA – the ability to listen to our clients, adapt our counseling to their visions and to create opportunities beyond the expected”.

 

VUC Syd - Haderslev

VUC Syd, Haderslev – Photo by Adam Mørk

 

IGLOO AART VUC SYD HADERSLEV

The IGLOOs at VUC Syd, Haderslev – Photo by Kirstine Mengel

Danish roots, Nordic reach

AART is an award-winning architecture firm with Danish roots and a Nordic reach. They recently acquired the Norwegian architecture firm SJ arkitekter, strengthening their position in the Nordic countries. And their Nordic reach is important when they design architecture, both for interior design and product design.

“Rooted in a Nordic, pragmatic design tradition, we offer an open mind and a strong will to help our clients realize their visions. We continuously work on strengthening our own processes, so that we can secure a flexible and strong foundation for developing our portfolio of projects throughout the Nordic countries,” says Anders Tyrrestrup.

 

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Vannkanten, Stavanger, Norway – Photo by Adam Mørk

 

Musholm

Musholm, Korsør, Denmark – Photo by Kristine Mengel

 

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Kulturværftet, Helsingør, Denmark – Photo by Adam Mørk

He rounds off: “To be able to maintain that flexibility your focus needs to be pointed away from yourself and towards your clients. That is when our brand stands out, most clearly. Not as an idiom but as a more substantial sight to identify ourselves with our clients’ visions and to create opportunities beyond their expectations – with design and architecture as a creative catalyst”.

Companies mentioned in this article

The goal of DANISH™ is to promote Danish architecture and design in a broad perspective, and demonstrate all the potentials in these fields.

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