Takes on Architecture, part I: Proportions

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Takes on architecture 01

Photo by Mikkel Frost

A children's home designed by CEBRA.

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Takes on architecture 02

Photo by Mikkel Frost

The Iceberg residential development in Aarhus designed by CEBRA.

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Takes on architecture 03

Photo by Adam Mørk

The Experimentarium in Copenhagen designed by CEBRA.

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Takes on architecture 06

Photo by Jacob Lerche

Villa Platan designed by ADEPT.

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Takes on architecture 05

Photo by Jacob Lerche

Villa Platan designed by ADEPT.

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Takes on architecture 04

Photo by Jacob Lerche

Villa Platan designed by ADEPT.

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C.F. Møller workplaces 1

Photo by Adam Mørk

At the forefront of the harbour in Aarhus, Denmark, the Danish clothing company Bestseller recently inaugurated a new office building designed by Danish architectural practice C.F. Møller.

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C.F. Møller workplaces 3

Photo by Adam Mørk

The Bestseller office complex designed by C.F. Møller houses 800 employees and resembles a flotilla with varied building volumes at different levels connected by a series of outdoor spaces, from courtyards to terraces and roof gardens.

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10 most beautiful pictures of Danish architecture 04

Photo by Adam Mørk

The Bestseller office complex in Aarhus designed by C.F. Møller.

Published
03.07.2017

In a series of articles, DANISH™ asks a group of experts to elaborate on different architectural parameters. Starting off with the fundamental component of spaces and spatial proportions, CEBRA, ADEPT and C.F. Møller give us their take.

 

Takes on architecture 01

Photo by Mikkel Frost

Mikkel Frost
Founding partner, CEBRA

‘I’ve always looked at spatial proportions as a kind of magical element in architecture. But in reality, it’s maybe not that complicated. Architects have always talked about proportions, but what it’s really about is that sizes and dimensions look harmonic in context with adjoining sizes and dimensions. When things look harmonic, then the proportions are just right.

‘When describing proportions, I usually use the drawing of a face as an example. You work with constant elements – a nose, two eyes and a mouth – and yet, you can draw a really ugly face or a really nice-looking one. It all comes down to proportions: sizes, distances, measurements and the relationships between the three.

‘That’s finding a balance. That’s finding the right proportions. The rule of thirds and other “rules” can help you, while Fibonacci numbers are also commonly used to get the proportions right. And I can’t even put one example forward, because we try to find the right proportions in every project we do.’

 

Takes on architecture 05

Photo by Jacob Lerche

Anders Lonka
Partner, ADEPT

‘We designed the Villa Platan from four rectangular volumes, seamlessly merging into a private villa sitting on the very edge between land and sea. The design is carefully tailored to the unique location using nature’s own colours and soft transitions between interior spaces, as well as between inside and outside, which makes the daily changes of the sea an integrated part of the architecture’s DNA.

‘The villa was completed for a private client with the opportunity to build at the edge of the sea. The client had a vision of a simple life in beautiful spaces, making the fantastic view an integrated part of everyday life in their home. The result is as unique as the location: a villa designed from four basic volumes with floating transitions.

‘Towards the street, the villa appears serene and closed, the primary volumes broken only by the precise entrance door. Towards the sea and the garden, small courtyards are embraced by open and transparent facades with views towards the sea. Sand-coloured Kolumba brick and robust oak framing add solidity to the villa, humbly adapting it to the exposed site. Curved white walls and broad plank floors melt the interior spaces together. All primary spaces have a contrasting end wall.’

 

C.F. Møller workplaces 3

Photo by Adam Mørk

Julian Weyer
Partner, C.F. Møller

‘Our Bestseller office complex in Aarhus mixes spaces of different sizes and at different levels, inside and outside, to create a city of its own, making room for 800 office workplaces, fashion shows, learning and re-energising.

‘The focal point of the complex is an internal “street”, giving varying glimpses into the outdoor atria, courtyards, terraces and green roof gardens, designed as a seamless continuation of the interiors and used as break-out workspaces and for impromptu meetings.

‘The architecture also open up unexpected vistas, letting in light, and frame panoramas of the city and seascape, making the movement along the internal “street” an almost cinematographic experience.’

 

This article is the first of several about “takes on architecture”.

In this series:

Takes on Architecture, part I: Proportions
Takes on Architecture, part II: The Inflow of Daylight
Takes on Architecture, part III: Sustainability
Takes on Architecture, part IV: Minimalism

Companies mentioned in this article