This Carpet Guide Will Rug Your World

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Carpet Ege

Garden State Hotel, Australia Photo by Ege

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Carpet Ege

Garden State Hotel, Australia Photo by Ege

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Carpet Ege

Hotel Le Louis Versailles Photo by Ege

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Ege Carpets

Photo by Jan de Vries

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carpets1

Photo by: ege Carpets

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ege Carpets

Photo by ege Carpets

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In the category Clean World, Ege and Carol Appleton won with the design solution Reform Memory – a carpet made from recycled water bottles and fishing nets. This is an innovative example of how sustainability can be incorporated into an industrial process and how the circular economy can be good business, without compromising on aesthetics or function.

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Hotel Danmark, ege4

Photo: ege Carpets

Luxurious and elegant design at Hotel Danmark in Copenhagen.

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Ege carpets

Published
11.04.2018

Thinking about rolling out a carpet soon? Whether it’s in your own home, in your office or you’re doing a bigger project, there are certain details you need to take into account when choosing the right solution. We’re looking up, down, in and out to cover this month’s theme on Danish™ that we call ‘It’s all in the detail’. Our attention has been brought downwards for this article where we’ve collected tips and tricks from ege, on details you need to pay attention to when working with carpets.

Shape and size of the room
Large office spaces, narrow hallways and rooms with many angles: One size does not fit all when it comes to choosing a carpet, which is why you need to think carefully about the shape and size of the room before installing your carpet. A wall-to-wall carpet or a ‘broadloom’ goes well with large spaces where you need to tie the room together. Working with prints or patterns you can create a unique visual effect in the open space that makes it look unique and brings out your identity. Sometimes, though, instead of tying a room together, you want to split it up into smaller spaces like ‘islands’. This is the case with multi-purpose rooms such as hotel lobbies and school halls, where you want people gathering in groups. In case of working with a narrow space such as a hallway or an apartment with many different rooms and weird shaped corners, carpet tiles might be the better solution. They are easy to fit into any room and give you a chance to work with colours and patterns without having to drag a gigantic broadloom into a tiny apartment.

 

carpets1

Photo by: ege Carpets

Noises and sounds
Gathering large groups of people, children and folks with a tendency to talk loudly is not a pleasant experience if the space reverberates. Carpets can absorb sounds and therefore often have a positive effect on the acoustics of a room. Some are better than others, but the ground rule seems to be: The more fibres and imperfections in a carpet, the better it is at trapping sounds. So, if you need to effectively bring the noises down in a room, go for thick wool, which has exactly those qualities. Some carpenters also produce special backings for carpets that are better at trapping noises than a normal carpet.

High traffic and wear on the floor
Large groups of people not only have an effect on the noise level in a room, but can also affect the type of carpet you buy in terms of wear on the floor. There is a big difference between installing a carpet in the hall of a well-visited museum and fitting one in a corner office that has only a few visitors per day. There are different types of carpet, suited for different levels of wear on the floor. And the way to measure which type of carpet you need to install is by counting the number of people that walk through the space per day. One unit means a pedestrian that walks over a segment of a carpet. The scale goes from 100 units per day, which is counted as light traffic, all the way up to 10,000 units per day, which is extra-heavy traffic. A chair on castors rolling on the floor also counts for a unit. So, either you need to sit very quietly on your office chair or you should consider looking for a carpet that has a certification such as EN 985 (special certification for office use).

 

Ege Carpets

Photo by Jan de Vries

Indoor climate
Dust and particles swirling around can cause irritation both for health and for cleaning, and vapour emissions from buildings are particular culprits, but carpets are good at trapping particles. Therefore, if especially children or people that are vulnerable to allergens are going to spend a lot of time in the room, you might want to look for a carpet that is well suited to catch those particles. Look for indoor quality certificates and the Cradle To Cradle™ certificate when choosing a carpet to improve indoor air quality. You obviously still need to vacuum, clean and do regular maintenance to keep up a healthy indoor climate.

Ergonomics
If you are the type of person that likes something soft under your feet or has problems with the likes of your back or knees, you could look for a carpet where ergonomics are thought into the material. The thicker a carpet is, the better it is at absorbing your feet, creating a softer surface and sparing your body unnecessary wear. Cold feet can also be rectified by a good carpet. So if you want to get rid of your worn-down slippers, look for a carpet that isolates well and keeps your feet warm.

 

Hotel Danmark, ege4

Photo: ege Carpets

Sustainability
Carpet manufacturers are working on making their carpets more sustainable. If you’re looking for a sustainable solution, there are two parameters: Materials and production methods. A carpet company might use raw sustainable materials that don’t leave a big CO2 footprint or work with recycled materials. But it is equally important that the company has a sustainable process of working with the materials. It can be difficult to do the research on your own, but you can look for certifications such as ISO 14001, which a company can earn if both products and materials meet certain environmental requirements.

Installation
When you have made all the right choices in regard to choosing your carpet, it is time for installation. The most difficult carpet to install is, no surprise, a wall-to-wall. It comes in big, heavy rolls which require both a lot of manpower and space to get through door openings. When in the correct room, roll out the carpet to check for inconsistencies, especially where two carpets are being connected. The carpet needs to be placed and stay in the correct position for 24 hours before installing, so that it has time to take the correct shape. If the space has a shape that makes it difficult to install the carpet or you’ve chosen to get a custom-made, it is best to either use a professional carpet fitter or get some guidance at least on how to install it properly.

We hope this article has equipped you well to ‘stay on carpet’ and if you want to dive deeper into the subject, feel free to read the ebook ‘The Ultimate Guide to Carpets’ by Ege Carpets, on which this article is based.

Companies mentioned in this article

The goal of DANISH™ is to promote Danish architecture and design in a broad perspective, and demonstrate all the potentials in these fields.

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