Discover Danish design and architecture through three different exhibitions

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At the Danish Architecture Centre (DAC) in Copenhagen, you can see the exhibition Groundbreaking Constructions – 100 Danish Breakthroughs that Changed the World.

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The exhibition Groundbreaking Constructions – 100 Danish Breakthroughs that Changed the World. runs until 3 January 2016.

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Danish Architecture Centre (DAC) in Copenhagen.

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Photo by Trapholt

Trapholt is showing 'Women in Danish furniture design'. The exhibition seeks to provide its spectators with a historic overview of Danish female designers. Here portrayed by Nanna Ditzel.

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Photo by Trapholt

Louise Campbell is also a part of the exhibition at Trapholt.

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Photo by Trapholt

'Women in Danish furniture design' runs until 24 January 2016.

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Photo by Lindhe

The Maritime Museum in Elsinore is designed by BIG. Beautiful rows of the 7 Series chair by Fritz Hansen embellish the museum.

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Photo by Iwan Baan

The Maritime Museum offers great architecture by BIG. It is an old dry dock.

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The exhibition STORM at the Maritime Museum of Denmark in Elsinore aims to describe one of the most severe risks when being at sea – the weather.

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From the Maritime Museum in Elsinore. The exhibition STORM runs until 12 June 2016.

Published
16.11.2015

This autumn you can visit three exhibitions that will allow you to experience a range of Danish design and architecture, with each offering unique displays and a creative use of the exhibition space.

At the Danish Architecture Centre (DAC) in Copenhagen, you can see the exhibition Groundbreaking Constructions – 100 Danish Breakthroughs that Changed the World. The main focus of the exhibition is the key developments in the history of construction that changed the perception of what is possible. Aimed at telling the stories of the quantum leaps forward in construction methods that not only solved the challenges posed by a single building, but also ultimately changed the world, the exhibition shows Denmark’s position as a pioneer in the field of innovative construction.

DAC’s exhibition pays special tribute to the engineers and the key role played by the collaboration between engineers, developers and architects. According to DAC, Danish engineers play just as an important role in the development and expansion of a building’s framework as architects do, and this exhibition highlights this key role by shining the spotlight on 100 Danish achievements in construction.

Groundbreaking Constructions – 100 Danish Breakthroughs that Changed the World has been developed in partnership between Realdania and the Danish Architecture Centre. The project is also supported by Rambøll, Sund & Bælt, Danish architectural practice DISSING+WEITLING Architecture and schmidt hammer lassen architects. The exhibition runs until 3 January 2016.

In Kolding, Trapholt – which is a museum for art, design and crafts – showcases the exhibition Women in Danish furniture design. The exhibition seeks to provide its spectators with a historic overview of Danish female designers, and illustrates how idioms have changed over the 120 years that the exhibited pieces span. Women in Danish furniture design runs until 24 January 2016.

Besides getting the chance to experience furniture designs of a number of Danish female designers, a visit to Trapholt also gives people the opportunity to view one of Denmark’s biggest collections of Danish furniture design, with pieces from both male and female designers. In addition, Trapholt’s architecture is noteworthy and well worth a trip to the museum alone.

Designed by Danish architects Bente Aude and Boje Lundgaard, the basic element of the museum building is a long wall that winds down the plot. Dividing the museum park into two areas – one facing west, the other facing east – the long wall runs from the parking lot by the museum’s main entrance and into the museum building, where it transforms into a long corridor that stretches the entire length of the building.

The exhibition STORM at the Maritime Museum of Denmark in Elsinore aims to describe one of the most severe risks when being at sea – the weather. The museum brings the guests closer to weather phenomena with virtual reality installations and wind tunnel models. Furthermore, film and sound contribute to the feeling of getting up close to the foaming sea and to metre-high waves. STORM runs until 12 June 2016.

If you are planning to go to the Maritime Museum of Denmark, also be prepared to experience great architecture by Danish architectural practice Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG). Set underground around the old dry dock of Elsinore Shipyard, BIG has preserved the old dock as an historical, industrial monument, leaving it open for outdoor exhibitions and events. When accessing the museum, you pass bridges spanning the dock, while the floors in the exhibition area slope gently downwards, so you can move around the building as you make a spiral descent.

The goal of DANISH™ is to promote Danish architecture and design in a broad perspective, and demonstrate all the potentials in these fields.

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