Lines - Looking for a Pattern

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©Anour

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©Marokk

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Published
16.03.2018

Whether it’s the lines that form a lamp or the lines formed by the tiles on the floor, there is a pattern in the designs, serving as a designer’s signature. Danish design companies Anour and Marokk, though working in different fields of design, think alike when putting a subtle mark on their designs. In this article we continue to look for patterns in design, as we did last week when we looked for patterns in the colours of Montana and Normann Copenhagen.

Anour is a Danish design company known for its uncompromising lamp design with a focus on sustainability all the way through the design process. And, as the observant reader would notice, it has a very clear pattern when it comes to the form of its lamp designs.

 

©Anour

‘All our designs are based on an essentialism philosophy. We like that the object quietly adds itself to the atmosphere of a space without being visually disturbing. We constantly search for the source of purity and perfection in our work,’ says Arash Nourinejad, architect and founder of Anour.

The straight and rectilinear shapes give the lamp designs an airy feel, making them able to fit into almost every room.

Arash specifies the use of lines: ‘Lines are an important aspect of our work. We see them as not boring, but pure, honest, and idealistic. They are also the basics within architectural practice – horizontal, vertical, curving, diagonal. Each has an impact on how you perceive space. They give a structure, a body.  It is a fascinating subject for us to work with.’

 

©Anour

The name Anour means ‘light’ in Farsi, the language spoken in Iran where Arash Nourinejad was born. And we also need to look outside Denmark’s borders to find the origins of the next brand, Marokk.

Marokk is a design company that works with traditional Moroccan cement tiles, mixing them with the simplistic Scandinavian style and form. We managed to get hold of the owner of Marokk, Peter Larsen, while he was visiting the factory in Morocco.

 

©Marokk

‘Our Diamond (diamond-shaped) and STIX (stick-shaped) tiles each have a special form, which opens up to multiple possibilities of combining the tiles. Users can define and create their own unique patterns, but, regardless of whether the choice is to design a pattern in solid colour tiles or, for example, create a 3D-like illusion with the Diamond tiles, you can in a subtle and understated way recognise the Marokk lines,’ says Peter Larsen.

 

©Marokk

Looking for patterns in designs is like a treasure hunt. At DANISH™ we love to search for details, carefully incorporated into designs, that become visual to those who pay attention. Next Friday, we continue the hunt for patterns. Until then you can check out our article from last week when we looked for patterns in the use of colours.

Companies mentioned in this article

The goal of DANISH™ is to promote Danish architecture and design in a broad perspective, and demonstrate all the potentials in these fields.

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