A look inside an artist's guest house

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Situated in the oldest part of Copenhagen – the canal of Frederiksholm – the Danish Art Workshops’ new guest house accommodates artists, designers and conservators/restorers from all over the world, offering them a living area while working on their next big project.

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The rooms have been furnished with modern classics designed by Danish furniture designers, such as Mogens Koch, Børge Mogensen, Poul Henningsen, Arne Jacobsen and Hans J. Wegner.

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The living room area with lamps designed by Poul Henningsen and Arne Jacobsen.

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The guest house building was originally an old smithy. For almost 70 years, the smithy belonged to the Sculptor School of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, and over the years some of the most significant sculptors have lived and worked there, including, amongst others, Anne Marie Carl Nielsen – married to the world famous Danish composer, Carl Nielsen.

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Photo by Morten Nilsson

The Danish designer Jonas Trampedach designed the kitchen interior made of metal and wood.

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The Danish designer Margrethe Odgaard designed the dining table and seating in the kitchen area.

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The main idea behind the interior design of the guest house was to create a balance between the historical characteristics of the area and modern Danish furniture design and to create a high quality living space.

Published
19.11.2015

Every year, the Danish Art Workshops lets artists, designers and conservators/restorers apply to stay in their guest house, while they work on particular demanding projects or large-scale installations. Situated in the oldest part of Copenhagen – the canal of Frederiksholm – the Danish Art Workshops’ new guest house accommodates artists, designers and conservators/restorers from all over the world, offering them a living area while working on their next big project.

The guest house building was originally an old smithy. For almost 70 years, the smithy belonged to the Sculptor School of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, and over the years some of the most significant sculptors have lived and worked there, including, amongst others, Anne Marie Carl Nielsen – married to the world famous Danish composer, Carl Nielsen. In November 2014, the smithy was reassigned to the Danish Art Workshops.

Now, the guest house has been refurbished and incorporates designs from both modern and upcoming Danish designers. Considered worthy of preservation by the Danish government, the guest house’s refurbishment work was quite a challenge for the Danish Art Workshops: Doors, outside walls and windows could not be changed, while the overall aim was to create a space that was habitable for three artists at a time.

The main idea behind the interior design of the guest house was to create a balance between the historical characteristics of the area and modern Danish furniture design and to create a high quality living space. New designs are constantly being developed in the workshops at the Danish Art Workshops, which means that the furniture in the smithy represent a dialogue between modern classic Danish design and upcoming contemporary design.

The rooms have been furnished with modern classics designed by Danish furniture designers, such as Mogens Koch, Børge Mogensen, Poul Henningsen, Arne Jacobsen and Hans J. Wegner.

The idea behind the new guest house is also that it should function as a showroom for the working designers, and it is flexible so that more design elements can be naturally added in the future as relevant projects are realised. The new interior design has been created by young and upcoming designers, who have resided at the Danish Art Workshops over the years.

These designers include Margrethe Odgaard, who designed the dining table and seating in the kitchen area, and Jonas Trampedach, who designed the kitchen interior made of metal and wood. Another Danish designer who contributed to the interior of the guest house is Line Depping, who designed the hangers in the hallway.

Sharing kitchen and bathroom facilities, the artists in residence each have their own room. As a homage to the old smithy and to leave an authentic impression on the everyday activities, a historic anvil is situated in front of the old stove in the kitchen area of the guest house.

The goal of DANISH™ is to promote Danish architecture and design in a broad perspective, and demonstrate all the potentials in these fields.

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