The Physical Reflection of Learning

01

Rosan Bosch august4

Photo: Kim Wendt

Kulturøen, Middelfart, 2016, by Rosan Bosch // Photo Kim Wendt

02

Rosan Bosch august5

Photo: Kim Wendt

Kulturøen, Middelfart, 2016, by Rosan Bosch // Photo Kim Wendt

03

Rosan Bosch august3

Photo: Kim Wendt

Kulturøen, Middelfart, 2016, by Rosan Bosch // Photo Kim Wendt

04

Illustration tiller 2

Illustration: Rosan Bosch

Three of the six learning situations used at Rosan Bosch

05

Illustration tiller 3

Illustration: Rosan Bosch

Three of the six learning situations used at Rosan Bosch

06

illustration tiller 1

Illustration: Rosan Bosch

The learning situations are not fixed and can be combined in thousands of ways depending on the specific need at the school.

07

Rosan Bosch august7

Photo: Kim Wendt

Bornholms Efterskole, 2013, by Rosan Bosch // Photo Kim Wendt

08

Rosan Bosch august6

Photo: Kim Wendt

Bornholms Efterskole, 2013, by Rosan Bosch // Photo Kim Wendt

09

Rosan Bosch august1

Photo: Kim Wendt

Vittra Södermalm, Stockholm, 2012, by Rosan Bosch // Photo Kim Wendt

10

Rosan Bosch august2

Photo: Kim Wendt

Vittra Södermalm, 2012, Stockholm by Rosan Bosch // Photo Kim Wendt

Published
18.08.2017

The Danish design and architectural company Rosan Bosch Studio has developed a unique perspective on the matter of learning.

Rosan Bosch Studio’s disruptive way of rethinking learning landscapes has made them among the leading specialists when it comes to designing innovative differentiated learning environments. Together with the Sør-Trøndelag Municipality, Rosan Bosch Studio is co-creators behind the transformation of the future Tiller High School in Trondheim, Norway.

The idea is to create a future-orientated school by focusing on effective schooling through integrating the school’s pedagogical learning principles combined with Rosan Bosch Studio’s design principles into the physical surroundings. A place where the physical learning environment helps to prepare students on how to perform in a globalized and digitalized society that is changing at a rapid pace.

In this particular assignment, the whole design and structure of the physical framework of Tiller High School is being rethought as part of the redesign and future integration. Rosan Bosch Studio is acting as a strategic partner and consultant on the project, which aims to showcase how design, art and architecture can facilitate change and development. A key task is to show how the physical surroundings of a school can help prepare students for a constantly changing world, one in which the experts today predict that the future way of working will demand lifelong learners who are genuinely committed to continuous learning throughout their careers and even lives.

Rosan Bosch Studio is not actually going to be designing the transformation of the school, but rather are acting as external consultants on the project; so far in particular, they played a key role in developing the competition brief.

Mixing the Perfect Ingredients
“This assignment is not about us designing a school by ourselves, but about us making sure that the defined vision and mission of the school will be implemented in the physical environment of the school. Together with the municipality, we’ve determined the right ingredients for the school’s transformation. Now, it’s up to the architectural team to make the recipe and develop the different flavours,” says Annette Saidj, senior architect and designer at Rosan Bosch Studio.

At the same time, Annette Saidj expresses how Rosan Bosch Studio will support the entire team throughout the project development, including ensuring the quality control and making sure that the guidelines, vision and mission of the competition brief are fully implemented in the final building.

These ingredients, Annette talks about, relate to six essential design principles combined with five area typologies. Each of the six design principles aim to ensure the learning landscape of the school meets the students’ individual needs and learning styles, while at the same time supporting their social interaction and knowledge sharing.

The six design principles, developed by Rosan Bosch Studio, are based on the various learning situations that can take place over the course of a school day, with a constant flow of students moving through these situations, which furthermore incorporate both group work and individual immersion activities.

Illustration tiller 2

Illustration: Rosan Bosch

Illustration tiller 3

Illustration: Rosan Bosch

“We have previously created differentiated learning environments all over the world, such as for the Vittra schools in Stockholm, Sweden, and through our previous work with schools, we have developed a deeply rooted knowledge, where we know what it takes for a learning environment to become a successful one. An effective learning environment needs all six design principles strategically incorporated within it, where all these design principles take centre stage and none of them are relegated to the corner. A harmonious relationship between these six design principles is essential to create a differentiated learning environment. This is exactly the situation we worked with at Tiller High School,” Annette says.

illustration tiller 1

Illustration: Rosan Bosch

Elasticity and flexibility
According to Rosan Bosch Studio, the physical environment is important when prepping brains for acquiring new knowledge and skills and for making one curious about exploring new knowledge. The mission of Tiller High School is to be a knowledge centre, where creativity, inspiration and entrepreneurship are the cornerstones of the learning experience.

An important feature of the school is that the school building will be flexible and one that can adapt to specific needs, which is something Rosan Bosch Studio incorporated in the brief for the design competition.

“The school must be elastic. It should be adjustable to the number of students, their different needs and possible changes in the educational programmes. It should also encourage physical movement, both indoors and outdoors.” Annette Saidj says.

When it comes to learning environments, it doesn’t matter whether you design a school in Scandinavia or South America. The working tools Rosan Bosch Studio uses are moveable and can be transformed to match the specific culture. A truly important part of any work the studio does, is the user involvement process – understanding the uniqueness of a client; their vision and their applied pedagogy – and, understanding the end user and their needs and wishes.

“Learning has the same purpose all over the world. Of course, there will be cultural differences, there even is when looking at Denmark and Norway, but the starting point is the same when it comes to our design principles. We simply just want to design to educate a new generation of innovative and independently critical thinkers,” Annette Saidj ends.

 

Rosan Bosch august2

Photo: Kim Wendt

Companies mentioned in this article

The goal of DANISH™ is to promote Danish architecture and design in a broad perspective, and demonstrate all the potentials in these fields.

Read our story