Tour of Legs

01

Photo courtesy of Fritz Hansen™

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Chieftain2

Photo by Frederik Bøgekær Ejdrup

03

Chieftain2

Photo by Frederik Bøgekær Ejdrup

04

Ox Chair2

Photo courtesy of Erik Jørgensen™

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Ox Chair1

Photo courtesy of Erik Jørgensen™

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Verner Panton DMD2

Photo by Frederik Bøgekær Ejdrup

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Verner Panton DMD1

Photo by Frederik Bøgekær Ejdrup

Published
22.05.2018

Legs have always been a vital part of the construction in all types of furniture, so Danish™ visited Designmuseum Danmark to take a look at some different approaches to leg design.

Project Manager at Design Museum Danmark and Cand. Mag. in Design Studies Sidsel Vogdrup-Schmidt shares her knowledge to give a better understanding of Danish leg design. The video above also features the following pieces from Danish designers Finn Juhl, Hans J. Wegner, Arne Jacobsen and Verner Panton.

Chieftain Sofa by Finn Juhl

In addition to the famous Chieftain Chair, Finn Juhl and cabinet maker Niels Vodder introduced the Chieftain Sofa in 1949. Finn Juhl often talked about the bearing and the borne elements of chairs and sofas. This sofa is a classic example of the seat as the bearing element and the backrest and armrests as the borne elements, with the latter two almost hovering above the construction.

Photo courtesy of House of Finn Juhl™

Ox Chair by Hans J. Wegner

The Ox Chair is considered one of Wegner’s more humorous designs, and in 1960, when designing this piece, Wegner said, ‘We must be careful not to take things too seriously. We must play but we must be serious about playing!’ With its floating, overproportioned seat and chromed steel legs, the Ox Chair remained one of Wegner’s favourite chairs until his death in 2007.

Photo courtesy of Erik Jørgensen™

The Egg / The Swan / The Drop by Arne Jacobsen

This year, Arne Jacobsen is celebrating the 60th anniversary of the design of The Egg, The Swan and the Drop for the Radisson SAS Royal Hotel in Copenhagen. All three chairs are iconic design classics, all equipped with simplistic steel legs for a modern look – even today, 60 years after they were drawn.

 

Photo courtesy of Fritz Hansen™

Panton Chair by Verner Panton

The futuristic Panton Chair is the world’s first one-piece, cantilevered plaster-cast chair. This design plays with the whole concept of what legs on chairs can be, with its counterbalanced stand. Since the early 1950s, Panton wanted to create a chair that was stackable, leading up to this design in 1965.

 

Photo by Frederik Bøgekær Ejdrup

Companies mentioned in this article

The goal of DANISH™ is to promote Danish architecture and design in a broad perspective, and demonstrate all the potentials in these fields.

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