Kay Bojesen

Published
01.09.2015
In 1951, the iconoclastic Danish silversmith Kay Bojesen (1886-1958) was awarded the prestigious Grand Prix award in Milan with an extraordinary set of silver flatware that took that same name. The Grand Prix flatware is at once a masterpiece of functional design, a singular expression of artistic values and an enduring emblem of modern, Nordic material culture.

The legacy of the Danish silversmith Kay Bojesen has been taken up by his family, and in 2011 his granddaughter Sus Bojesen Rosenqvist re-launched the foundation for his treasured design, namely the silverware and stainless steel lines, to honour the importance of aesthetics, functionality, and pragmatism.

With his steel work, Kay Bojesen broke away from the silversmith tradition as he laid great weight on the fact that his models should be produced using the new industrial production methods. On this premise, Kay Bojesen simplified traditional cutlery pieces and in doing so created beautiful and practical utensils and tableware that sit somewhere between traditional forms and modern design. None of these works were ever drawn or sketched, but instead shaped by hand to work and perform, to hold and to last.

Originally designed in silver in 1938, the Grand Prix flatware series corresponds fully with his view on how modern design should be simplified and usable.

By honouring her grandfather’s talented eye for combining functionality and aesthetics, Sus Bojesen Rosenqvist has founded a design house that underpins the importance of simple and functional design exemplified by the best all-round cutlery of modern times.

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